Study Uncovers Details of Information Processing in the Brain

See below the full report from Neuroscience News highliting the role of the Alpha oscillations in information processing:

Image shows the researcher fitting an EEG cap onto a test subject.
Kyle Mathewson, assistant professor, and Sayeed Kizuk, graduate student, demonstrate the use of EEG technology for studying information processing in the brain.NeuroscienceNews.com image is credited to Dawn Graves.

“We are bombarded with so much information and stimulation that we can’t possibly process it all at once. Whether it be commuting, engaging in our work, studying for a class, or working out, our brains select the useful information and ignore the rest, so that we can focus on a single or a few items in order to make appropriate responses in the world. This research helps explain how,” says Mathewson.

Mathewson is now working on stimulating the brain at alpha frequencies in order to understand how to improve brain function in meaningful ways. For instance, improving one’s ability to focus and perform in real-world situations, such as working on a project or riding a bike.

“To better understand how the brain and mind works can help us improve performance and attention in our everyday lives, to improve our safety, increase our work productivity, do better at school, and perform better in sports,” explains Mathewson. “We’re developing and testing novel, portable technologies to make this possible.”

The paper, “Power and phase of alpha oscillations reveal an interaction between spatial and temporal visual attention” was published in the Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience in fall 2016.